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More About the Videos

The content for the Frank and Paco series was carefully planned and researched by a team of professionals including two bilingual educators and a linguist. The main references are the Real Academia de Española and the Asociación Cultural Antonio de Nebrija through web site elcastellano.org. Not only does this series introduce basic vocabulary and phrases, it also provides extra discussions about articles, pronouns, verbs and the alphabet. This is not only for the enlightenment of a curious student but also for the inquiring parent, guardian or teacher.

Volume 1 has 3 Chapters: Home, Eating/Drinking, and Play. There are nearly 50 words/phrases covering those topics most important to children. The Home chapter contains words for important members of the family like mommy and daddy. There are also words for the rooms in the home. The Eating/Drinking chapter has a variety of words covering favorite drinks and food items as well as simple sentences for I want, I like and I don’t like. Play covers those fun places like the park and activities like swimming. It also reviews important safety rules for crossing the street. A fun song summarizes all of the words and phrases. Appendices provide more information about verbs, articles, and pronouns. For more mature viewers, don't miss the Rapid Review at the end of the DVD.

Also, in Volume 1, we introduce five verbs as parts of phrases and short sentences: yo tengo hambre and yo tengo sed, yo quiero, me gusta and no me gusta and yo puedo. These are important especially to a child because it is about what the child wants, needs and is able to do. There are four ways to say “the” in Spanish—la and las are for feminine words and el and los are for masculine words. La is used for most words ending in a. For example, the Spanish translation for kitchen is la cocina, not just cocina. La is used because cocina ends in the letter a. El is usually used for most words ending in o. So, we have el baño for bathroom. Los and las are used when the noun is plural. If there are several kitchens, we say las cocinas. If there are several bathrooms, we say los baños. In general, words ending in o are considered masculine and words ending in a are considered feminine, but there are some important exceptions as discussed in the video as well as the FAQS portion of this web site. We also introduce first person nominative in the case of Yo for I, the possessive pronoun mi and the reflexive pronoun me as in me gusta, meaning I like it.
Volume 2 has 3 Chapters: My Day, My Body, and My Feelings. There are nearly 50 vocabulary words/phrases. My Day follows the events of a typical day for any child. It begins with waking up, covers meals and snacks and even going potty and ends with getting tired and going to sleep. My Body has a comprehensive list of all the parts of the body from the head to the toes. My Feelings covers all the emotions from happy to angry and also presents terms for please, thank you, you’re welcome and I’m sorry. A fun song summarizes all of the words and phrases. Appendices provide more information about verbs, articles, and pronouns. For more mature viewers, don't miss the Rapid Review at the end of the DVD.

Also, in Volume 2, we introduce several reflexive verbs for situations describing when children go about their day and take care of themselves. Most of these end with se, indicating the reflexive action of doing these things to or for oneself. There is washing and cleaning of the hands and teeth. There is getting dressed, vestirse. There is combing of the hair, peinarse and there is brushing of the hair, cepillarse. Also, a special pronoun is introduced--lo for it.
Volume 3 has 3 Chapters: The Alphabet, Numbers and Colors. The alphabet is reviewed several times and examples are provided for words which begin with each letter. Numbers covers numbers 1 through 20. They are presented individually and sequentially. There are a variety of colors from red through gray. A fun song summarizes all of the letters, numbers and colors. An important appendix explains the alphabet in more detail. For more mature viewers, don't miss the Rapid Review at the end of the DVD.

Also, in Volume 3, the Spanish Alphabet is discussed. A common belief is that the traditional Spanish alphabet has 30 “letters”. However, according to the Real Academia de Española, since 1803 to the present, there have been only 29 letters in the Spanish Alphabet. All 29 letters were established because they represent the 29 sounds found in the Spanish language. These cover all requirements for both spelling and phonetic pronunciation. The alphabet is thoroughly explained in the video.